Mexican Dry Rub

Mexican Dry Rub

What seasonings do you use when you want to make a batch of tacos or grill some fajitas? Do you use individual spices in a jar such as cumin, chili powder and garlic powder? A Mexican spice blend purchased at the store? Taco seasoning in a packet? I’ve tried them all and been frustrated by each. The only way to get a consistent south-of-the-border taste you love is to mix your own batch of Mexican spices. Plus, it’s a good way to make sure your seasonings stay fresh. Spices lose flavor the longer they sit in jars on your shelves. I like to make small batches of this blend and use it for several meals over the course of a few weeks. It’s not hard, and it’s a great way to ensure you know how your food is going to end up tasting. 

Mexican Dry Rub

July 14, 2019
: 6
: 10 min

By:

Ingredients
  • 3 Tbsp. New Mexico Red Chile Powder*
  • 2 Tbsp. cumin
  • 1 Tbsp. onion powder
  • 1 Tbsp. garlic powder
  • 1 Tbsp. sweet paprika (I don’t like smoked but if you do, go ahead and use it)
  • 2 Tsp. Mexican oregano
  • 1 Tsp. red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper
  • 1 Tbsp. kosher salt (less if you like)
  • 1 Tbsp. pepper
Directions
  • Step 1 Mix the spices in a bowl and keep in an air-tight mason jar. This will make enough for several batches of Mexican cooking. You can use it in tacos, fajitas, queso dips, quesadillas, black bean soup, guacamole — just about any one of your favorite Mexican recipes.

*Most Mexican spice blend recipes call for “chili powder.” The problem is, there are a million brands of chili powder and virtually all of them are blends in and of themselves. Go ahead, look at the chili powder in your pantry. I’ll bet you find it has other ingredients, such as cumin and garlic powder. What you want is a pure chili powder and preferably of the New Mexican variety. You can get pure chili powder at Whole Foods, but I find it easiest to order it from a reliable, high-quality on-line vendor such as The Spice House. Some people actually make their own chili powder by roasting and grinding Ancho and New Mexican (and other) chilis themselves. One day I might actually get around to doing this.